Top 100 ish and everything else

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johnnyutah
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Re: Top 100 ish and everything else

Post by johnnyutah » Tue Dec 26, 2017 7:39 am

P R A G U E

very cool...



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dustin
"But seriously, narrative is for pussies."
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Re: Top 100 ish and everything else

Post by dustin » Sat Jun 02, 2018 6:15 pm

Twin Peaks: The Return, Darkness Visible

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dustin
"But seriously, narrative is for pussies."
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Re: Top 100 ish and everything else

Post by dustin » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:00 am

Montreal Trip:

Berri-UQAM Metro Station
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Murals everywhere, including projected ones:
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The city of Spiral Metal Stairways, Back Alleys and Corridors
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Notre-Dame
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La Maison Publique - The Best Restaurant: unpretentious, inviting, amazing food
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Candi Bar
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Etc
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johnnyutah
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Re: Top 100 ish and everything else

Post by johnnyutah » Fri Aug 03, 2018 7:57 am

wow nice pics



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dustin
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Re: Top 100 ish and everything else

Post by dustin » Mon Dec 17, 2018 7:20 am

For reference purposes:

Standing up for cinema
Martin Scorsese on the power of film-making as an art form
MARTIN SCORSESE

I am neither a writer nor a theorist. I’m a filmmaker. I saw something extraordinary and inspiring in the art of cinema when I was very young. The images that I saw thrilled me but they also illuminated something within me. The cinema gave me a means of understanding and eventually expressing what was precious and fragile in the world around me. This recognition, this spark that leads from appreciation to creation: it happens almost without knowing. For some, it leads to poetry, or dance, or music. In my case, it was the cinema.

Quite often, when people discuss the cinema, they talk about single images. The baby carriage rolling down the Odessa Steps in Battleship Potemkin, for instance. Peter O’Toole blowing out the match in Lawrence of Arabia. John Wayne lifting Natalie Wood in his arms near the end of The Searchers. The blood gushing from the elevator in The Shining. The exploding oil derrick in There Will Be Blood. These are all absolutely extraordinary passages in the history of our art form. Extraordinary images, to be sure. But what happens when you take these images away from those that come before and after? What happens when you lift them out of the worlds to which they belong? You’re left with records of craftsmanship and care, but something essential is lost: the momentum behind and ahead of them, the earlier moments that they echo and the later moments for which they prepare the way, and the thousand subtleties and counterpoints and accidents of behaviour and chance that make them integral to the life of the picture. Now, in the case of the blood-gushing elevator from The Shining, you do have an image that can exist on its own – really, it can stand as a movie on its own. In fact, I believe it was the first teaser trailer for the movie.

But that image on its own is one thing and how and what it is within the world of Stanley Kubrick’s film is something else again. The same goes for each of the examples I’ve mentioned above, all of which have been excerpted in countless clip reels. As artfully put together as some of those reels are, I find them disconcerting, because they usually amount to a series of official “great moments” pulled away from their contexts.

It’s also important to remember that most of these images are actually sequences of images: Peter O’Toole blowing out the match followed by the sun rising over the desert, the baby carriage rolling down the steps amid the chaos and brutality of the attack by the Cossacks. And beyond that, each separate cinematic image is comprised of a succession of still frames that creates the impression of motion. They are recordings of instants in time. But the moment you put them together, something else happens. Every time I get back into the editing room, I feel the wonder of it. One image is joined with another image, and a third phantom event happens in the mind’s eye – perhaps an image, perhaps a thought, perhaps a sensation. Something occurs, something absolutely unique to this particular combination or collision of moving images. And if you take a frame away from one or add a couple of frames to the other, the image in the mind’s eye changes. It’s a wonder to me, and I’m far from alone. Sergei Eisenstein talked about it on a theoretical level, and the Czech filmmaker František Vlácil discusses it in an interview included on the Criterion edition of his great medieval epic Marketa Lazarová (1967). The film critic Manny Farber understood it as elemental to art in general – that’s why he named his collection of writings Negative Space. This “principle”, if that’s what you could call it, is just as applicable to the juxtaposition of words in poetry or forms and colours in painting. It is, I think, fundamental to the art of cinema. This is where the act of creation meets the act of viewing and engaging, where the common life of the filmmaker and the viewer exists, in those intervals of time between the filmed images that last a fraction of a fraction of a second but that can be vast and endless. This is where a good film comes alive as something more than a succession of beautifully composed renderings of a script. This is film-making. Does this “phantom image” exist for casual viewers without an awareness of how films are put together? I believe it does. I don’t know how to read music and neither do most people I know, but we all “feel” the progression from one chord to another in music that affects us, and by implication some kind of awareness that a different progression would be a different experience.

In the January 4 issue of the TLS, there was a review of my most recent film, an adaptation of Shūsaku Endō’s novel Silence. The review, written by Adam Mars-Jones, was not entirely positive, but I found it thoughtful and, for the most part, carefully considered. There were, however, two points with which I took issue: a factual error and a series of statements about the cinema. I wrote a letter to the TLS in response to both points. When the Editor notified me that the letter would be published (March 17), he asked me if I might be interested in writing a piece that would elaborate on my response to Mr Mars-Jones’s thoughts about the art of film. I decided to take Mr Abell up on his offer.

Over the years, I’ve grown used to seeing the cinema dismissed as an art form for a whole range of reasons: it’s tainted by commercial considerations; it can’t possibly be an art because there are too many people involved in its creation; it’s inferior to other art forms because it “leaves nothing to the imagination” and simply casts a temporary spell over the viewer (the same is never said of theatre or dance or opera, each of which require the viewer to experience the work within a given span of time). Oddly enough, I’ve found myself in many situations where these beliefs are taken for granted, and where it’s assumed that even I, in my heart of hearts, must agree.

I do not mean to imply that Mr Mars-Jones subscribes to all of the above positions. However, he does seem to have an opinion about the cinema that is more or less in sympathy with such harsh assessments. “Even the most relentless book filters diffusely into the life of the reader”, he writes, “while a film suspends that life for its duration.” I know for a fact that this isn’t true, based on my own experience. First of all, it seems to me that we all want to surrender ourselves to art, to live within a given film or painting or dance. The question of how an artwork is absorbed in time, whether we’re standing before it in a gallery for a matter of minutes, reading it over a matter of weeks, or sitting in a dark theatre and watching it projected on a screen for two hours, is simply a condition, a circumstance, a fact. So yes – when I’m really watching a film from beginning to end, I’m not stopping it to make a phone call and then starting it again. On the other hand, I’m not letting the film override my existence. I’m watching it, experiencing it, and along the way seeing echoes of my own experience illuminated by the film and illuminating it in turn. I’m interacting with the film in countless ways, great and small. Never once have I felt like I just sat there and let a picture wash over me like a tidal wave, and then come back to my senses as the lights came up. Mr Mars-Jones’s conception of the film-viewing experience seems to be quite different from my own. For me, it was always a source of excitement and enrichment. I’m sure that the same can be said for many of my fellow filmmakers.

“In a book”, writes Mr Mars-Jones, “reader and writer collaborate to produce images, while a film director hands them down.” I disagree. The greatest filmmakers, like the greatest novelists and poets, are trying to create a sense of communion with the viewer. They’re not trying to seduce them or overtake them, but, I think, to engage with them on as intimate a level as possible. The viewer also “collaborates” with the filmmaker, or the painter. No two viewings of Raphael’s “Madonna and Child Enthroned with Saints” will be the same: every new viewing will be different. The same is true of readings of The Divine Comedy or Middlemarch, or viewings of The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp or 2001: A Space Odyssey. We return at different moments in our lives and we see things differently.

I also disagree with Mr Mars-Jones’s contention that any adaptation of a novel into a film can only amount to a “distortion” or an “exaggeration overall”. Of course, in one very important sense, he is correct. Alfred Hitchcock once told François Truffaut that despite his admiration for Crime and Punishment, he would never have dreamed of making a film out of it because in order to do so he would have needed to film every single page (in a sense, this is what Erich von Stroheim tried to do when he adapted Frank Norris’s McTeague as Greed). But sometimes, the idea is to take elements of a novel and craft a separate work from it (as Hitchcock did with Patricia Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train). Or, to take the cinematic elements of a novel and create a film from them (I suppose that this was the case with certain adaptations of Raymond Chandler’s novels). And some filmmakers really do attempt to translate a novel into sounds and images, to create an equivalent artistic experience. In general, I would say that most of us respond to what we’ve read and in the process try to create something that has its own life apart from the source novel.

As I said, I found Mr Mars-Jones’s review of my film quite thoughtful, and I do not wish to take issue with his opinion of the picture. But as a working filmmaker, I wanted to stand up for the art form to which I’ve devoted the better part of my life, and that has given me so much.



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dustin
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Re: Top 100 ish and everything else

Post by dustin » Sun Dec 23, 2018 9:44 am

Top 30 Favorite Films 2018

1. Long Day's Journey into Night - Bi
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2. Ash is the Purest White - Jia
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3. 24 Frames - Kiarostami
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4. High Life - Denis
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5. The Wild Pear Tree - Ceylan
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6. Burning - Lee
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7. Les garçons sauvages - Mandico
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8. The Favourite - Lanthimos
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9. Transit - Petzold
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10. Roma - Cuaron
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11. Jeannette, l'enfrance de Jean D'Arc - Dumont
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12. First Reformed - Schrader
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13. Happy as Lazzaro - Rohrwacher
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14. Mandy - Costamos
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15. Les fantômes d'Ismaël - Desplechin
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16. Shirkers - Tan
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17. Image Book - Godard
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18. Barbara - Amalric
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19. Cold War - Pawlikowski
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20. Bisbee '17 - Greene
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21. You were Never Really Here - Ramsay
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22. Laissez bronzer les cadavres - Cattet, Forzani
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23. Like Me - Mockler
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24. Bloodlight and Bami - Fiennes
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25. The Crescent - Smith
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26. La Douleur - Finkiel
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27. BlackKklansman - Lee
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28. El mar la mar - Bonnetta, Sniadecki
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29.Taste of Cement - Kalthoum
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30. Non-Fiction - Assayas
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